Help with Weather History Reports


 

I need a daily report showing precipitation in inches from July 01 2011 thru June 30th 2012. How do I get it?

First, make sure you are logged in.  Log in here.  Once logged in, you will be presented with the weather history search engine.

Now search for past precipitation by simply filling in the location and the date(s) you need:

Search for past daily precipitation

Select “Precipitation” and then click “find report” to submit your search.

You will then be presented with a list of stations that have the data you are looking for:

Past daily precipitation search results.

The list is sorted so that the best results are first.  Results are calculated from stations’ proximity to your search location and data completeness for your time period.  Therefore, the top result is typically the best for you, but we present all options in case you have a preference or a need for another specific location.

In this particular example, the nearest station is 9.2 mi – not exactly ideal as the weather station is not located at the users search location.  (Unfortunately the government does not have weather stations on every corner.  We’re limited to what they have. )  Fortunately, you will often find there is often a station very close to your search location – especially in and around major metropolitan areas.  Ideally you would like to find a weather station within a few miles of your search location when dealing with precipitation because it can vary so much over a short distance, but considering what the government typically has available, even 9 or 10 mi. away is still useful, especially if you are dealing with a long report over a long time frame (months or years) as things will even out over long times like that.   So while it may not reflect exactly what precipitation fell in your location, it is appropriate if your are trying to get a sense of what was typical for your location over time.  Temperature on the other hand is widely applicable for distances of up to 20 miles or more in most cases, as temperature does not usually vary widely over short distances.  Exceptions to this would be changes in elevation, or locations near large bodies of water (such as large lakes or oceans).

Finally, select the weather station that is best for you and you will instantly be given the past precipitation report with a graph at the top and actual data values below:

Daily Precipitation Report Example

From here, you will also have the ability to export data for your own spreadsheet (csv) or database analysis via the “spreadsheet and pdf downloads” button at the top.  The spreadsheet data is csv (comma-separated values) formatted text data suitable for use in Excel or any other standard spreadsheet software.  The PDF download is a professionally prepared document created specifically for professional use, such as in legal or financial use.

You will also be able to change the dates of this report and even the weather data show in the report, using the “change weather and dates” button at the top.  If you want to change location, return to the search results page and select another station.

How do I customize the weather history report to show the past weather data I need?

In the report, you can change the report to show any weather data reported by the weather station.  Use the “change weather and dates” button at the top of your report to customize your report to show the historical weather data you want.

 

Change Weather and Dates .

Customize the report to your needs by clicking the “change weather and dates button”.

This is where you set the report to show any weather data the station reports.   You will get the “Report Options” page, as shown here:

 

For example, if you are looking for storm observations, check the “Storm Observations” box, as show above.  If you wanted, temperature, precipitation or something else, you would select those – whatever you want in your report, select it here and then click “update” at the bottom right.  Your report will then be updated with whatever is selected here.

Hourly and daily” type stations typically report the following:

  • Temperature
  • Precipitation
  • Snowfall
  • Wind Speed and Direction
  • Maximum Wind Speed
  • Cloud Cover
  • Dew Point
  • Humidity (relative humidity)
  • Specific Humidity
  • Wet bulb
  • Visibility
  • Barometric pressure
  • Station pressure
  • Sea-level pressure
  • Altimeter
  • Feels-like temperature
  • Heat index
  • Wind chill
  • Cooling degree days
  • Heating degree days
  • Growing degree days
  • Significant Weather (storm) Observations: Rain, freezing rain, snow, fog, thunder, lightning, hail, tornado
  • Hourly data
  • Daily data
  • Monthly data (if enough days are selected)
  • Annual data (if enough days are selected)

Not all weather stations report the full gamut of weather data.  “Daily”-only stations report just daily temperature and precipitation (rainfall and snowfall), or even just precipitation or just temperature.  If only temperature and/or precipitation and snowfall are available in the weather station you selected from the search results list and you need something else, you can go back to the historical weather search engine to find another station in the area that reports what you need.  Run your search again and try the next station in the search results list.  You can identify the best station in the area with the data you need using search results list – look for an “hourly and daily” type weather station if you need more than just temperature, precipitation and snowfall.

If you want monthly, annual or full period summaries, you can select that here too – as long as the date range selected is long enough.  For example, say you wanted annual summaries of precipitation and cloud cover (which can be used to approximate sunshine, or, more accurately, lack thereof) for the last 10 years.  Click the “change weather and dates” button as shown above and get the “Report Options” window shown below.  Now select “Annual” and “Precipitation” and “Cloud Cover” as highlighted red here:

Annual Cloud cover and precipitation

Then click the update button and you will be taken to your report of annual cloud cover and precipitation, which will look something like this (depending on your exact location and dates):

Annual Cloud cover and precipitation

Notice that total precipitation and mean average cloud cover are plotted.  That’s because they are checked at the top of the data table.  You can also plot maximum and minimum cloud cover for each year, but that was always 100% and 0%, respectively, so I left it unchecked.

Much more additional cloud cover and precipitation data that does not fit nicely on the web page report is available via export (download) via the “spreadsheet and pdf downloads” button outlined red in the image above.  When you click that button, you will get a window that allows you to choose either a PDF or spreadsheet (csv) download (export).  Click the “download spreadsheet” button as outlined red here:

That will give you a csv file which will open in Microsoft Excel or any other standard spreadsheet editing software.  It will look something like this (depending on exactly what you have selected to view in your report):

 

SpreadsheetAnnualCloudCoverPrecip

 

As you can see here, the spreadsheet download contains a lot more additional weather data not contained in the web page report.  This gives you the ability to run more powerful analyses on your own within Excel (or other spreadsheet applications), such as creating your own graphs/plots or data presentations.

In this particular example, the spreadsheet download provides several data points not included in the web page report, such as

  • prcp: Total precipitation in inches
  • prcp10thDays: Days with .1 or more inches of precipitation
  • prcp1Days: Days with 1 or more inches of precipitation
  • prcp2Days: Days with 2 or more inches of precipitation
  • prcp5Days: Days with 5 or more inches of precipitation
  • prcpDays: Days with precipitation
  • prcpFlag: Flag to indicate trace precipitation
  • prcpHalfDays: Days with .5 or more inches of precipitation
  • prcp_Grt: Highest daily precipitation in inches
  • cloud: Cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudAvg: Average cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudAvg_Avg: Mean average cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudAvg_Grt: Highest average cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudAvg_Lst: Lowest average cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudClearDays: Days with no reported clouds
  • cloudClearHrs: Hours with no reported clouds
  • cloudDays: Days with reported clouds
  • cloudHrs: Hours with reported clouds
  • cloudMax: Maximum cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudMax_Avg: Average maximum cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudMax_Grt: Highest maximum cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudMax_Lst: Lowest maximum cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudMin: Minimum cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudMin_Avg: Average minimum cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudMin_Grt: Highest minimum cloud cover as a percent value
  • cloudMin_Lst: Lowest minimum cloud cover as a percent value

Full listing of all possible data points available in the downloads and their associated definitions is available in a text file download via the “download spreedsheet definitions” button in the ‘downloads’ window shown above.

Full list of all definitions for all data points available in the csv download is also available here.

 

How Do I get Wind Direction Information in my report?

Daily wind direction is available, but because it varies throughout the day, it does not fit conveniently in the daily web page report.  We provide hourly, daily, monthly, annual and full-period wind-direction data.

If you are looking for average wind direction (i.e., such as climatological normal), the hourly wind-direction observations are tallied over time to obtain a wind direction distribution.  This is done by tallying the original hourly observations over the time period you choose in the report.

You can obtain wind direction data as follows:

1. If you change the report to view to hourly data, it will show the wind direction every hour throughout the day.  Hourly data is available by clicking the “change weather and dates”  button in the report and selecting “Hourly”.  That assumes the station you’re interested in reports hourly data.  If not, you can identify another station in the search results with hourly data.  Look for an “hourly and daily” type station in the search results.

2. If you specifically require daily, monthly, annual or full summary wind direction data, you can download the spreadsheet (csv) data file (please see the ‘download’ button at the top of the report).  Using that file, you can see the distribution of the number of hours the wind came from each direction over the time period of your choosing.  You can use these values to deduce the prevailing wind direction for each day, month or year you are interested in (the direction from which the wind originated the most hours each day, month, etc, is the prevailing wind direction for that day, month, etc)

 

Can you provide details on wind speed, maximum wind speed, and wind direction?

Wind is the movement of air and is expressed in terms of direction and speed. It is provided in miles per hour. And it is customary in meteorology that the wind direction provided represents the direction from which the wind is blowing. For example, a ‘North Wind’ blows from North to South. Weather Source provides Wind Direction in units of compass degrees:

  • 90 degrees: the wind is from the East,
  • 180 degrees: the wind is from the South
  • 270 degrees: the wind is from the West
  • 360 degrees: the wind is from the North.

Zero (0) degrees is generally used to represent calm conditions (no air movement). HOWEVER, Zero (0) degrees can also mean the wind direction is variable, particularly at low wind speeds. Thus if the wind direction is zero and wind speed is zero that means the wind is calm. If the wind direction is zero and wind speed is NOT zero, that means the wind direction is variable. According to the Federal Meteorological Handbook, variable wind direction is defined as follows:

5.4.2 Variable Wind Direction. The wind direction may be considered variable if, during the 2-minute evaluation period, the wind speed is 6 knots or less. Also, the wind direction shall be considered variable if, during the 2-minute evaluation period, it varies by 60 degrees or more when the average wind speed is greater than 6 knots.

Maximum Wind Speed 

Maximum wind speed (aka, max wind) is the highest wind speed reported each hour. Max wind speed for any hour is calculated by taking the greatest of three values reported for each hour: (1) wind speed, (2) wind gust, and (3) peak wind speed.   Because it is not always windy, the criteria for wind gusts and peak wind speed are not always met, in which case wind gust or peak wind speed may not be reported and therefore there is no value for them.  If there are no values for wind gust or peak wind speed, then the max wind would simply be the maximum reported value of the wind speed for each hour.   If there is no value for peak wind but a wind gust was reported, then the max wind would be the value of the reported wind gust.  If peak wind speed is reported, then max wind would be the peak wind speed.  Wind gusts and peak wind speed are only reported when certain criteria are met: Gusts are only reported when the wind is characterized by rapid fluctuations in wind speed with a variation of 10 knots (11.5 mph) or more between peaks and lulls. In which case, the maximum instantaneous speed is reported as a gust. The peak wind is only reported whenever the maximum instantaneous speed is greater than 25 knots (28.75 mph).

Essentially the wind speed is whatever 2-minute-average wind speed is reported during the routine report at the end of the hour (or any special report during the hour), whereas the max wind is the maximum instantaneous wind speed observed anytime during the hour, if available.  More details on wind speed is available from the Federal Meteorological handbook.

Our max wind value is derived from the greatest of the three values described in sections 5.4.3, 5.4.4, and 5.4.5 of the handbook.

All of our U.S. wind data comes from the National Weather Service (NWS), which in turn get their data from Airports and other sites subject to the same rigorous rules, regulations and oversight. Standard height of the NWS wind towers is 10 m. The height of measurement for every station is 10 meters (32′ 9 3/4″).

 

Can you provide details about how precipitation is reported?

Weather Source provides precipitation as ‘inches of liquid water’.  For non-frozen precipitation (rain and drizzle), this is simply the direct measurement of the precipitation depth in a rain gauge. For frozen precipitation (such as snow, sleet, hail, etc.) the frozen precipitation is melted and the depth of the melted liquid (also known as the liquid equivalent) is measured and recorded as the amount of precipitation.  If there is a mixture of both liquid (rain) and frozen precipitation (snow, etc) at the same time, the total precipitation is the sum of both the rain and the liquid equivalent of the frozen precipitation.

 

What does ‘Trace’ mean in the precipitation report?

Instead of an amount of precipitation, you may see a report of “T” or “TRACE”. Trace means that precipitation was observed falling, either by a human observer or an automated instrument, but the amount that fell was below the threshold of what is measurable. For example a couple drops of rain, or a few stray flakes of snow (such as snow flurries). The amount is generally not even enough to cover the surface. Generally speaking, this refers to less than 0.01 inch of liquid precipitation or 0.1 inch of snowfall.

 

How do I get hourly data or an “hourly and daily” type station in the report?

Hourly data is available from “hourly and daily” type stations.  These stations can also be changed to view daily, monthly and annual data as well (if enough days are selected).

“Hourly and daily” type stations give you access to the following historical weather:
  • Temperature
  • Precipitation
  • Snowfall
  • Wind Speed and Direction
  • Maximum Wind Speed
  • Cloud Cover
  • Dew Point
  • Humidity (relative humidity)
  • Specific Humidity
  • Wet bulb
  • Visibility
  • Barometric pressure
  • Station pressure
  • Sea-level pressure
  • Altimeter
  • Feels-like temperature
  • Heat index
  • Wind chill
  • Cooling degree days
  • Heating degree days
  • Growing degree days
  • Storm Observations (Rain, freezing rain, snow, fog, thunder, lightning, hail, tornado)

To view such data in your report, please follow these steps:

First, make sure you are logged in.  Log in here.  Once logged in, you will be taken to the weather history search engine.

Now search for past weather data — making sure the station provides “hourly and daily” data by selecting an “hourly & daily” type station from the search results, as shown in the red circle:

After selecting an “hourly and daily” station, the report provides daily data by default.  If you want hourly or monthly or annual data, you will need to change the report as follows:

Click on the “Change weather and dates” button circled red at the top of the report, as shown here:

Change Weather and Dates Customize your report

 

This will open the report options page.  For hourly data, select either “hourly” or “hourly (with special observations)”.  As you can see in the image below, daily, monthly and “full summary” data are available as well.  Full summary gives a summary for the full period you select in the “Dates from/to” boxes.

Report Options - Change Weather and Dates

Report Options.  ”Hourly” will give you pure hourly data in your report (ie exactly 1 and only 1 value per hour for the entire report).  ”Hourly with special observations” will give you the maximum detail possible as provided (reported) by the weather station.  In other words, if the station provided weather reports multiple times per hour (typically during stormy or unusual weather) then the report will include these as well.

This is also where you select the weather you wish to see in your report – in the “Information to Display” section.

If you select “hourly” weather data and click “update” on the options window, your report will show the hourly data you desire.  The same is true for daily, monthly and full summary data.  Assuming you selected hourly data, the report type will now say “Hourly” at the top of the report, as circled red below.  Data is graphed at the top, and hourly data is provided below the graph, as shown here:

Report Options - Select Hourly Temperature and Wind Data

All data in you select in your report, can also be exported by clicking the “spreadsheet and pdf downloads” button at the top of the report.

If hourly data is not available in the report options, then that means that the station you selected does not report hourly data and you must return to your search results and select a nearby station for your report that provides hourly data.  Select a station classified as “hourly and daily” in the search results, as shown above.

If you selected an “hourly and daily” type station and it doesn’t have the data you need, you may need to return to your search results and select a different “hourly and daily” type station that reports the particular data you are looking for.  Some stations may not report all weather data.

What is the difference between “hourly” and “hourly (with special observations)”?

Select hourly if you want pure hourly data (ie exactly 24 observations per day.  Select “Hourly (with special observations)” if you want as much detailed information as possible every hour.   If there is more than one report per hour, this will show it.  This is particularly useful for things like accidents or other such legal cases where you need to know what was happening as close as possible to the time of the incident.  Note that while this will provide as much information as possible, and it will only provide what was reported by the weather station.  They may not have reported more than once per hour, but if they did, it will show up with this type of report.  If the weather is fair, then there will typically be only one report per hour.  During stormy or inclement weather, it is common to have more than one report per hour.

 

What are ‘special’ observations?

A special observation is an observation that is taken in between the regularly scheduled observations that are taken each hour. A special observation is reported when the weather conditions are unusual or notable such as the start or end of precipitation associated with a storm, or when it’s very windy, etc.

 

How can I determine hourly snowfall?

The U.S. Government, unfortunately, (for all intents and purposes) does not report hourly snowfall amounts.  They do, however, provide enough information we can deduce  what was happening every hour and estimate hourly snowfall amounts.

  • verbal descriptions of what was falling every hour (such as “snow”, “light snow”, “moderate snow” or “heavy snow”).
  • precipitation amount
  • temperature

You can configure the weather history report to show these things in  the report, as follows:

  1. Click the “change weather and dates” button at the top of the report.
  2.  In the “Information Type” section, select “hourly”.  If ‘hourly’ is not a choice, then this station does not report any hourly data.  Return to the search results page and select an “hourly & daily”-type station to use a station that does report hourly data.
  3. In the “Information To Display” section, select the following, then click “update”:
  • “Storm observations”
  • “precipitation”
  • “temperature”.

Now you will get reports of what was falling (light, moderate or heavy snowfall) and the melted liquid equivalent of any snowfall, and what the temperature was.  And now you will have everything you need to deduce and estimate the hourly snowfall amounts.  Here are some tips to take this information to estimate hourly snowfall amounts:

  • Generally speaking, to convert liquid precipitation amounts to snowfall in inches, the rule of thumb in meteorology is to multiply the liquid equivalent of precipitation by 10 to arrive at the estimated equivalent snowfall amount.  So for example, 1/10 inch of precipitation equates roughly to 1 inch of snowfall.   But this depends on temperature.
  • Generally speaking, the colder it is when the snow was falling, the less dense (“fluffier”) and drier and lighter the snow is and the greater the snow depth for a given liquid precipitation amounts.
  • Generally speaking, the warmer it is when snow is falling , the wetter, heavier or more dense the snowfall is for a given liquid precipitation amount.
  • Here is a table you can use to estimate the approximate snowfall amounts given the temperature and precipitation amounts that were reported: http://www.erh.noaa.gov/box/tables/snowfall-meltwater.html.  Of course, this only makes sense if it was actually snowing.  Use the verbal text descriptions in the report to determine if it was actually snowing each hour.

Which weather station should I select from the weather history search results?

When you do a search and get the search results list of stations to choose from, select stations from the top of that list.  They are the best stations for your particular search as determined by our search algorithm – it takes the data completeness and distance of each weather station into consideration when compiling search results for you.  The closest weather station with the most complete weather record for the weather elements you selected will be shown first.  They will be the most complete for the particular weather elements you selected in your search.

Please note that some stations are not complete through the entire period, so even though some stations further down the list might be closer to your search location, they may not be the best.  They’re probably missing a lot of data for the period you searched on if they are not shown high on the list.

Also note that some elements at a station may be complete while others are not, so if there is a particular weather element you need more than any other, search on just that weather element alone.  That will isolate that weather element in the search algorithm and result in the best weather station (closest and most complete) for that particular weather element.

If you require more than one weather type and you are having difficulty getting a station with complete data for all the weather elements you need, you can break the search down into multiple searches – one for each weather element.  That will force the search algorithm to find the best station for one element at a time.  It may result in multiple stations serving your needs.

If you try everything and are unable to find adequate weather data for your location, it may just be that there is no official U.S. Government weather station in the area.  They do not cover everywhere.  If that is the case, please contact us and we will try to find a solution for your particular needs.

 

Why is the report is not showing the rainfall [or snowfall] on the date I expected?

Most users have absolutely no problem with our reports, as all our data comes from official U.S. Government weather stations.  In fact, sometimes people love our reports so much they send us wonderful positive feedback (please see testimonials at the bottom of the page.)   On very rare occasion, however, the weather reported does not match what the user already knows about a particular weather event.   This is usually due to a shift in the reported rain or snowfall totals due to the way some stations report their totals.  Some stations report their weather observations once per day at 7 or 8 am (or similar), instead of at midnight (as one might expect).  This is because many of the U.S. Government’s weather observers are volunteers and tend to be unavailable at midnight.    This can shift snowfall or rainfall totals forward a day.  This may result in instances where the reported date does not match the date of the recorded event of interest.  Specifically, if a station reports at 7 a.m., the reported data represents total rainfall or snowfall for the previous 24 hours of weather – ie 7a.m to 7 a.m.   So, rainfall or snowfall totals may include rain or snow that fell over two different calendar days ie – 7 a.m. to midnight on the day of interest, plus midnight to 7 am on the next day  ie, the day after  the event of interest.  So if the bulk of the rain or snow fell after 7 am on the day of interest, and no rain or snow fell before that, then the report would show no rain or snow for the day of interest and then it would show all the rainfall or snowfall for next day.

This is all due to the fact that many of these government observers are unpaid or minimally paid volunteers, many of which are retired and have weather stations at their home or place of business.  The government allows them to take the observations when it is more convenient to them rather than the middle of the night.  You can see in the report what time the daily observation was taken via date column where it includes 0700 or 0800 (or similar) in the date.

More information regarding how the National Weather Service Cooperative Observer Program works can be found at http://www.weather.gov/om/coop/.

If this doesn’t help and the weather station you selected is not showing rain or snowfall at all, try searching another nearby station in the area.  It’s possible that one station may not report weather as expected, while other surrounding stations do.  All the weather data in the weather history reports comes from official U.S. Government weather stations, but sometimes a weather station can be lacking data.

If there is any difference between what you saw and what is reported by the station in our report, then it could be that the station had different weather than where you were.  Weather can often change dramatically over a very short distance.  This is particularly true with precipitation (rainfall and snowfall) as well as severe weather (wind, hail and tornadoes).  Please check multiple surrounding stations to get a sense f what the weather was like in the area.

If you are looking for severe weather, here is a link to a free government site that shows all reports of severe weather – wind, hail and tornado – that have been reported anywhere – even away from official NWS weather stations.  Any severe weather reported to the National Weather Service would show up at the NOAA Storms Prediction Center’s archive website: http://www.spc.noaa.gov/archive

 

I downloaded a report into an Excel file and need help knowing what the definitions are for the abbreviations at the top of the spreadsheet.

Definitions are available for download in the online report – see the “spreadsheet and pdf downloads” button in the weather history report – there is a “definitions” button which you can use to download all the definitions.

 

How can I get the downloaded csv (excel/database) file to give me the past weather information I need?

First, select the information you want to see in the report using the options in the “change weather and dates”  button at the top of the report.  Then, click the “Spreadsheet and PDF Downloads” button at the top of the report. Then when you download the csv file, it will contain all the same information you selected.

 

Can you please tell me where your monitoring station is located?

All the data in the weather history reports comes from official weather stations of the U.S. National Weather Service.  Please click on the station name in the report to get all the details about the official U.S. National Weather Service weather station used in your report, including:

  • station identification
  • station location
  • data completeness
  • distance from your search location

 

Do you have past lightning data?

We collect daily and hourly reports from the U.S. Weather Services.  Lightning – if reported at all – would be in the report.   HOWEVER, it would have to have been observed by the weather station, AND it wouldn’t pinpoint the location.  This is probably not the best solution for you if you are looking for data to support lightning damage at a specific location.

There is a company that has a private lightning network and can tell you precisely where and when lightning struck, and you should probably check there first http://www.vaisala.com/weather/products/dataarchivereports.html

 

Do you have historical severe weather data – hail, damaging winds or tornadoes?

Hail, wind and tornado (storm data), if reported, would be in the reports under “storm observations”.   HOWEVER, it would have to have been observed by an “hourly and daily” type weather station, (see here for details) AND severe weather data is reported ONLY if observed in the vicinity of the weather station.

All our severe weather data comes from official full-time government weather observing stations such as airports, military bases, and other government sites with officially trained observers, and it is not ideally suited for research into specific past severe weather events such as wind, hail and tornadoes at locations other than these stations.   Only a small fraction of severe weather occurs close enough to these stations to be observed by and reported by these stations and entered into the record.  Official government weather stations are spread out many miles, and therefore, severe weather often occurs in between these stations – too far away to be seen by them.  Thus, they rarely show up in the official record for these stations.

Here is a link to a government website that shows all reports of severe weather – wind, hail and tornado – that have been reported to the National Weather Service:

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/archive

This is the NOAA Storms Prediction Center archive site.  Their reports are much more complete as they come from anyone anywhere on the ground (government officials, non-government volunteers such as storm chasers, and the general public) anyone that witnessed any severe weather and called it in to the weather service, not just official weather stations (where we get our data).  Enter a date in the little white box down the page where it says “Archived Preliminary Storm Reports” and you will get a listing of every report of wind, hail and tornadoes for the entire US for that day.

You can also search the severe weather archive at NCDC:

http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwEvent~Storms

 

 

How can I get the historical weather data certified?

We can provide an affidavit stating that data in our reports comes from the U.S. Government – specifically the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  If you specifically require a certified report, please contact the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC).  They are the only organization in the United States with the authority to certify weather data.

It’s very easy to call NCDC and order a copy right over the phone:  828-271-4800 (9am – 4:30 Eastern).  Simply tell them the station(s) you received, the date(s), and report type (ie daily or hourly), and they will mail you a certified copy via the U.S. Mail.

You can also order it online from them, which costs slightly less, and can be done 24/7.

For more information, please see NCDC:

http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/about/ncdcordering.html#CERTIFICATION

 

How can I get Sunrise/sunset times?

Please see this page: http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/RS_OneDay.php

 

How do I print the report?

Printing is done through your web browser utilizing your web browser’s printing capability.  Please consult the help manual for your particular web browser for how to print from your web browser.

 

I purchased a subscription.  How do I log into my account and view my weather history reports?

Access your subscription via the account page using this link https://weathersource.com/account , or clicking on “My Reports” at the top of any page on our website http://weathersource.com .

 

In the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet download,  I am getting number signs (“#####”) – a.k.a pound signs, or “hashtags” – instead of dates in the date column.  How do I get a document I can use?

This is an unfortunate feature of Microsoft Excel such that if the width of the data (dates) is too wide (ie wider than the default column width), then it turns the value into a string of pound signs (hashtags) “#####” instead of showing the visible portion of the date. [ugh!].  To resolve this issue, please simply widen the column in excel and the date values will be shown.

How can I get detailed station information about the weather station used in the reports?

Just search for the past weather you need

When you click on the “find report” button, you will be given a list of search results:

SearchResults

Click on one of the weather stations listed to find the historical weather data you are looking for.

Items are sorted by best match from top to bottom; the first item in the list is the most likely to provide what you searched for.

For best results, select the item at the top of the list first, and then if for some reason that station does not meet your needs, select the next one down the list, and so on.

Inside of each report are all the details for each weather station you select.  For example, if you select “Boston Logan Int’l Arpt” (from the list above) you will get the past weather report for Boston Logan International Airport. Before you create reports, you may be interested to know more details about a weather station before creating reports.  Once inside the report, you will see the station name listed at the top (circled orange):

Station

The name of the station is shown at the top of the report.  Click on this to reveal extensive information about the weather station used in the past weather report:

StationReview

The weather station review give you copious weather station information, including location and data completeness details.  Location information is provided via map relative to your search location, as well as city, state zip code and lat/lon (not shown here).


For additional help with the Weather History Reports, you may also watch the video tutorial.

If you still need  help, please contact us via the following email – it will be given top priority.

Email: support@weathersource.com

 


 Try Risk Free

If you are considering purchasing access to our Weather History Reports, we thought you’d like to know we guarantee your satisfaction or your money back.  If you have any problem whatsoever, our expert meteorologists will work with you to resolve the problem and provide to you what you were originally after.  If it turns out it is just not possible and you are still not satisfied, we will refund your money.  We are confident that our weather history reports will provide what you need.  We are an “A+” accredited company with the Better Business Bureau.

Our weather history reports are very powerful and professional and so easy to use.  Many customers have have fallen in love.  We’re confident you will too.

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Learn more about our Weather History Reports.

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